Dr Tim O'Hare
Dr Tim O'Hare

Senior Research Fellow, CNAFS

Dr Tim O’Hare is a plant physiologist researching the development and biofortification of fruit, nuts and vegetables with naturally enhanced health benefits, in particular carotenoid, glucosinolate, and mineral-based phytonutrients (Zn, Se).

Current projects include the development of high-zeaxanthin sweetcorn (see story) as a dietary protective measure against macular degeneration (AMD), tropically-adapted high-lycopene tomatoes for prostate cancer, and zinc/selenium biofortification of macadamia nuts. 

With a background in fruit physiology and biotechnology, his expertise lies in determining the physiological, biochemical and genetic limitations to enhancing phytonutrient concentration in popular fruit, nut and vegetables.

His research combines the disciplines of plant breeding and molecular analysis, phytonutrient compositional analysis, pre-harvest and postharvest factors affecting phytonutrient accumulation, and biofortification’s impact on product quality.

Contact:

Dr Tim O'Hare
Tel: (07) 5466 2257
Int:   +61 7 5466 2257
Email:  t.ohare@uq.edu.au

 

O'Hare Research Group. (L-R) Adam O'Donaghue (PhD),  Isabelle Quillet (Masters intern), Mingxia Han (PhD), Laurent
Rossi (Masters intern), group leader Tim O'Hare (PhD).

O'HARE, Dr Tim section

'SuperGold' corn to slow major eye disease

16 Dec 2013
New sweet corn varieties developed by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
(DAFF) and UQ's Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI) could help slow eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading form of blindness in Australia.

Fields of gold for better vision

24 Jan 2013
THE HEALTH BENEFITS of eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables are well recognised, but consuming two serves of fruit and five serves of vegetables a day might be even more beneficial thanks to a research partnership between QAAFI and the Queensland Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF).

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